North Iowa Fishing Report for July 14 | Outdoor | globegazette.com

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Cedar River (on Nashua): Water levels have stabilized, but could change depending on the localized shower activity. The water is dirty and flows fast. Be careful when navigating; Submerged dangers are not visible. Catfish Channel – Good: Use worms and cheeses or smelly fish bait at the bottom of the river. Bass of small mouth – Fair: use spinnerbaits or crankbaits to fish deeply. Walleye – Fair: Try a template and a twister tail or a worm fishing in the whirlpools and the loose water.

Clear Lake: The water temperature is in the upper 70s. Walleye – Fair: The anglers are succeeding in fishing the rock reefs with a jig and a leech and fishing on docks with a small fish. Channel Catfish – Good: drag the rock reefs with the trackers. Yellow Low – Fair: fish the edge of the vegetation in 4 to 6 feet of water with a small piece of caterpillar or leech.

Crystal Lake: Largemouth bass – Good: try the spinnerbaits fish at the edge of the vegetation. Bluegill – Good: use a small piece of caterpillar caught under a bobber in 2 to 3 feet of water. Black Crappie – Fair: Drift a small fish or a tube template into the cut by dredging.

Silver Lake (Worth): Largemouth bass – Good: bass bites a variety of baits. Bluegill – Good: use a small piece of caterpillar caught under a bobber in 2 to 3 feet of water. For information on lakes and rivers in the north-central area, contact the Clear Lake Fish and Wildlife Office at 641-357-3517.

Storm Lake (including Little Storm Lake): White Bass – Fair: Use leeches, trackers and twisters. Walleye – Fair: Try leeches or crankbaits. The drag crankbaits along the dredging cuts on the east side of the lake and west of the Big Island have worked well. Channel Catfish – Fair: try to cut the bait, the stinky bait or the fish trackers at the bottom. Target areas with rocky structure near the coasts.

Decorah District Streams: The wild parsnip is in maximum bloom; Be careful when walking on this plant to reach your favorite stream. Keep your arms and legs covered to avoid unpleasant blisters. The weekly averages continue. Brown trout: good: Brown trout is feeding on terrestrial insects that wash in the stream from storms. Also try crayfish. Rainbow trout: good: the configuration of a big fish or bluegill is ideal for trout fishing. Place a piece of cheese or a small piece of worm on a hook under a bobber in a good hole and wait. Brook trout – Fair: with dirtier water, try to use woolly buggers, San Juan worms or other flies and subsoil decoys.

Upper Iowa River (above Decorah): The water remains dirty and the flows are high. Be careful when rowing; The trunks and submerged rocks are not visible. Bass of small mouth – Fair: use spinnerbaits or a template with plastic tails that are fished in the deepest pools and whirlpools. Walleye – Fair: cut shelves of fish and batteries of brushes.

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Upper Iowa River (below Decorah): The water remains dirty. The emergent showers will make the water dirty. Be careful with water; High flows and limited visibility can cause dangerous conditions for paddlers. Bass Smallmouth – Fair. Walleye – Fair.

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Fishermen, it's your moment. After making your big catch, take a picture and send it to us. Be sure to include when, where and how you caught it. Send your presentation to [email protected] We're going to run as many as we can online and in print.

Lake Hendricks: Water temperatures are in the low 80s. The clarity is improving, but a flowering of algae is beginning. Black Crappie – Fair: Crappie are unpredictable. Fishes of deeper waters. A slow troll can make you hit a hook. Bluegill – Fair: Find fish in deeper waters at the edge of the weed beds. Use a small piece of worm under a bobber. Largemouth Bass – Fair: Use surface water lures fish on the edge of weeds. Channel catfish – Well: the channel catfish is stinging. Use worms, smelly baits or cheese baits. Leave your bait on the bottom until you feel a pull; place the hook.

Lake Meyer: Water temperatures are in the low 80s. It is starting a flowering of algae. Fishermen who report success or lack of action for the panfish. Bluegill – Fair. Black Crappie – Fair. Largemouth Bass – Fair. Canal Bagre – Bueno.

Volga Lake: Water temperatures are in the mid 80's. A flowering of green algae is present. With warmer temperatures, the fish are moving towards deeper waters. Bluegill – Fair. Black Crappie – Fair. Largemouth Bass – Fair. Channel catfish – excellent

Kathryn Barton – Muskie

Kathryn Barton - Muskie

Kathryn Barton holds the 41.6-inch, 20-pound muskie she caught from her pier in Clear Lake on April 29.

Photo sent

Steve Young Muskie 1

Steve Young Muskie 1

Steve Young of Parkersburg shows the 50-inch muskie he caught and threw in Clear Lake on May 15.

Courtesy of Tyler Evers

Child catches muskie

Child catches muskie

Hunter Palmer, 10, of Mason City, caught and launched a 37-inch Muskie off the south coast of Clear Lake in May 2018. He was testing his new "Lost Look" hook that he had just obtained from the bait shop on the Camino from where he caught the muskie. The hook was empty and had no bait. The length of the fish was measured and it was released quickly back into the lake. Palmer tied him up and a friend of the family helped him get it on the net. The Muskie is Palmer's first big fish.

Kaylara Hoadley

Houston Muskie in East Park

Houston Muskie in East Park

Houston Conway has a 14-pound muskie he caught on the Winnebago River in East Park on Sunday, May 21, 2017. His brother, Logan Conway, also caught a muskie that day.

Provided

Logan Conway and Muskie

Logan Conway and Muskie

Logan Conway has a 15-pound, approximately 45-inch muskie that he caught on the Winnebago River in East Park on Sunday, May 21, 2017. His brother, Houston, also caught a muskie in the park that day.

Provided

Steve Ibarra 2

Steve Ibarra 2

Steve Ibarra, of Mason City, holds a 37-inch northern pike that he caught on the Winnebago River in East Park on February 17, 2017. He said he regularly catches pikes, walleye and bats in the park.

CUT FIORINI, The World Gazette

Muskie

Muskie

Nicole Steen shows a 38.5-inch muskie she caught with her boyfriend Alex Templeton in Clear Lake on Sunday, August 28.

Photo sent

Muskie from the sea wall

Muskie from the sea wall

Manly's Fred Pokorney caught this 44-inch, 21.2-pound muskie on a dock at the Sea Wall on May 13.

Photo sent

Clear Lake Muskie

Clear Lake Muskie

Rick Fowler, Moville, caught a 49-inch muskie while fishing on a pier in Clear Lake on Tuesday.

Photo sent

Walleye from Nasheim

Walleye from Nasheim

In June 2003, Nick Nasheim, 13, of Mason City, noticed that this walleye was sliding over Clear Lake. I was using a worm.

Stock Photo

Dalen's cat

Dalen's cat

In a 1999 photo file, Cerro Gordo County prosecutor Carlyle Dalen shows a 44-pound catfish he caught on the Mississippi River near Red Wing. It took Dalen and one hour and 5 minutes to land the fish on an 8-pound test line. I was fishing walleye and using a template.

Stock Photo

Redig big fish

Redig big fish

Michael Redig of Forest City shows an 8-pound 10-oz pike that he caught in June 2008 in Clear Lake. The 28.5-inch fish was the largest Redig he had ever caught.

Stock Photo

Cat of the street 12

Cat of the street 12

Steven Randall, 11, of Mason City, shows the 8.5 pound catfish he captured in June 2006, across from the 12th Street Bridge in Mason City. He used a night fisherman to catch the big cat, the biggest one so far. Steven was fishing with his father, Joe. The fish was returned to the Winnebago River.

Stock Photo

Muskie by Tom Caswell

Muskie by Tom Caswell

Tom Caswell shows the 42.5-inch muskie he caught in April 2010, off Farmer Beach in Clear Lake.

Stock Photo

Big fish in San Ansgar

Big fish in San Ansgar

From the left, Christian Vorland, Noah Diekhuis (both from Clear Lake) and Robert Kase from Manly, show the northern pike they captured in 2002 on the Cedar River near St. Ansgar.

Stock Photo

Northern pike Santee

Northern pike Santee

Gerald Santee, from Nora Springs, holds a 27-inch Northern Pike that he captured at the Nora Springs Dam in April 2010.

Stock Photo

Richards River Monster

Richards River Monster

Don Richards, Mason City, has a 45-inch, 25-pound muskie that he caught on the Winnebago River in East Park in April 2008. It was the third muskie he caught on the Winnebago River. Richards has released every muskie he has captured.

Stock Photo

The randall pike

The randall pike

Joe Randall raises the Northern Pike he caught in Mason City at Big Black Pit in September 2003.

Stock Photo

Northern pike Mike Uhlenhopp

Northern pike Mike Uhlenhopp

Mike Uhlenhopp of Alexander shows a 39.25-inch northern pike that he caught on February 24, 2005, in Clear Lake. He used a template on the 6 and 8 pound test line to land the fish, which weighed 15.10 pounds.

Stock Photo

Lenz gets a big one

Lenz gets a big one

Ruby Lenz, ninety-two years old, captured this 9-pound catfish in July 2008, at the Ventura grade. She and 10 other residents of the Concord Care Center in Garner spent part of the day fishing on the lake and enjoying an alfresco meal.

BY MOLLY MONTAG [email protected]

Georgia Hanford Cat

Georgia Hanford Cat

Jon Lee, of Mason City, gives his son Ryan, 11 the catfish, which weighs more than 15 pounds, the two stopped while fishing bluegills in 2004 at Georgia Hanford Park in Mason City.

Stock Photo

Frank and the fish

Frank and the fish

Donnie Frank holds the 25 pound Northern Pike he captured in July 2000, in a pond on private property. Frank used fish liver and an odor spray to prime the fish, which he said was probably in his line for half an hour.

photo file

Northern pike from Echelbarger

Northern pike from Echelbarger

Robert Echelbarger of Mason City shows the 39-inch, 12-pound northern pike he caught in June 2006, on the Cedar River, just below the Mitchell Dam. Echelbarger was fishing with her son, Rob.

Stock Photo

This Walleye Park

This Walleye Park

Scott Alman caught a Walleye in East Park in Mason City in June 2003.

Stock Photo

Mother and son muskie

Mother and son muskie

The Globe Gazette, 6-year-old William Elston and his mother Tammy Dibert, both from Mason City, captured a 50-inch Muskie at Clear Lake in 2003.

2 for one in Clear Lake

2 for one in Clear Lake

Wyatt, Craig and Leo Anderson show the muskie and the type of fish that Leo, 6 years old, on the right, caught in Clear Lake in June 2016. The muskie held the kind of fish in its mouth when Leo tied the Couple together.

Photo sent

Big muskie caught in Clear Lake in January 2016

Big muskie caught in Clear Lake in January 2016

Mark Zirbel picks up a 49.25-inch muskie that he caught on Clear Lake in January 2016. He had to push the muskie through a narrow ice hole, which he barely traversed, to land the great lunker.

Courtesy of Mark Zirbel

Jeff Lutcavish with northern giant

Jeff Lutcavish with northern giant

Jeff Lutcavish said he captured this 23-pound North Sunday at a private quarry near Mason City in November 2015.

JARED PATTERSON, the Globe Gazette

Catfish in Clear Lake

Catfish in Clear Lake

You never know what will bite your hook on Lake Clear Lake, in north central Iowa. Chris Scholl captured this catfish in 2015.

Fishing in the midwest photo

Trout Muskie

Trout Muskie

Tyler Trout of Mason City shows the great muskellunge he took out of Clear Lake in June 2015.

Photo sent

Gregor Walleye

Gregor Walleye

Kristina Gregor shows the 24-inch, 5.45-pound pike perch that she and her husband Tom captured while fishing on the ice in Clear Lake in 2015.

Photo sent

Classic fall of walleye

Classic fall of walleye

Clear Lake Fishing Club secretary Dan Krauth has a 6.05 pound pike perch trapped by Alan Gilbert and Del Brown's team during the Clear Lake Fall Classic pike-fishing tournament in 2014.

TIM ACKARMAN, By The Globe Gazette

Net pikeperch

Net pikeperch

DNR fisheries biologist Scott Grummer holds a 47-inch musk captured during the 2014 spring network in Clear Lake. The fish, which was launched, had a circumference of 24 inches and weighed 39 pounds.

Courtesy of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Gabe Haugland

Gabe Haugland

Gabe Haugland of Clear Lake caught this 42-inch musk in Clear Lake on May 18.

Pikeperch

Pikeperch

Trish Tiedemann of Mason City caught this 8-pound, 28-inch pike while fishing at Leech Lake in Minnesota.

Brad Tiedemann

Jensen & # 39; s Fishing the Midwest: Autumn may be the best time to fish trophies

Depending on where you live, young people and their teachers are preparing to go back to school, football season is here or just around the corner, and the fall fishing season is not far away. Some people may not like this progression of seasons, but many fishermen like it. They know that autumn can provide the best catch of the year for both fish and trophies. Many fishermen have caught the biggest fish of their life in the fall. If we want to make the most of autumn fishing, now is a good time to make preparations to do so. The following are some things that should be kept in mind while preparing for fall fishing.

Whether you are fishing in a lake, river or reservoir, sometime in the fall the fish will go to school. In the summer they will be educated freely most of the time, but when the fish feel that the temperatures of the water go down and they notice that the days are shortened, they will be grouped. Therefore, it works well if you move with an eye on your catheter until you find the fish hanging.

The importance of paying attention to his sonar was again taken home on an autumn trip to Lake Kabetogama a couple of years ago. Kab is known for its walleye, but it is also a world-class small-mouth fishery. We were fishing the small mouth in deep structures. We place the structures on the maps in our sonar units, then cross over them looking for fish. The first two spots had no fish, the third showed fish.

We launched templates and direct shooting platforms and we had immediate action. Just for the fun of it, we tried similar looking structures that did not show fish in the sonar, and that's what we got: nothing. The fact that you have to fish where the fish are if you want to fish was reinforced that day. We were using the Raymarine sonar at that time: I can not remember what units we had, but Raymarine's Axiom sonar series that we are using now does an incredible job of showing fish, and they have the other necessary characteristics that they do. The catch of fish is much more consistent.

The fall season begins with a new line. As we begin the season with a new line, we want to make sure that our connection to the fish is in good shape in the fall. Make sure that when that fish of life eats your bait, your line is ready to handle it. There are many line options out there, and they all have a purpose. Having said that, day after day, I use P-Line CX or CXX Premium. They are like a monofilament line, and I have developed a lot of confidence in them. If I want more sensitivity and a better ability to get hooked, I use the XTCB braid with a tactical fluorocarbon leader. This configuration provides the ultimate in strength and minimal stretch, but allows a very natural presentation.

In the fall, fish as larger lures. Even the smallest fish eat larger baits in the fall. Mother Nature tells the fish that it is better to eat a large meal instead of several smaller ones. Use big bait for big fish.

There are many options for recreation in the fall. Football and hunting occupy a lot of people's time. But if you like to fish, save some time to do it. The climate is pleasant, the scenery is pleasant and the catch can be exceptional. Find out for yourself when the leaves of the trees become colorful.

Fishermen from northern Iowa have landed some large fish over the years, staggering with huge pike-perch, northern pike, catfish and muskies. This gallery with …

Muskies: Mitchell County conservation intern explains the mysterious fish & # 39; (with photos)

OSAGE | Local fishermen had the opportunity to hear about the "mysterious fish", also known more commonly as the muskie, by Levi Nettleton, a recent naturalist intern from Mitchell County Conservation.

Nettleton, who will be a student of higher education in science at the University of Northern Iowa this fall, told attendees that the muskies are known as the mysterious fish because of its unpredictability.

"Musks are very unpredictable," he said. "You can find them in waters that are 6 inches to 100 feet deep. They look like a pike, but they have six teeth instead of five teeth like north and north are stained. "

Nettleton said that a female Muskie can lay up to 265,000 eggs, but its survival rate is very low. They grow better at water temperatures of 55 to 65 degrees, and lay their eggs at random in shallow water where predators can consume them.

"Many fishermen believe that the muskie is a great consumer of other game fish such as sea bass and walleye, but they are prone to eat softer fish such as bull heads and minnows," Nettleton said, noting that they also eat insects, crabs, small mammals and waterfowl.

"Many believe they are aggressive, but that is not true, unless they are feeding," he said. "For naturalists, they are complicated to study."

Nettleton said Muskies habitats also vary, which means they can be found in weeds such as tobacco cabbage or 30 feet deep in open water. He said that fishermen can find them in different places throughout the year.

Nettleton shared his enthusiasm for catching the big game fish, something he started four years ago.

"Once you do it, it can become an addiction," he said. "There is a lot of skill in muskie fishing, and sometimes, the muskies are called the fish of the 100,000 specimens."

The Nettleton study has rewarded him well, as he caught and threw 36 mussels last year and 12 so far this year.

Anglers looking for musk often use sticks from 7 to 10 feet, according to Nettleton. It uses a reel of 300 to 400 feet with 22 pounds of resistance, with 50-100 lines of braid and leaders of steel or fluorocarbon.

It also carries needle nose pliers over 8 inches and a rubber net, so it does not hurt the Muskie.

He gave some additional pointers:

• Leave the catch in the water and hold it and release it when the fish is calm.

• Cut the hook if the fish has been hooked deep.

• Do not fish more than 80 degrees.

• If you perform the drag, start at 2 mph and increase to 4 mph.

• Make figures-eights to attract musks.

Nettleton, whose largest catch was 53 inches long, said there are Muskies in the Cedar, Iowa, Shell Rock and Winnebago rivers, as well as in Clear Lake.

The largest populations of muskies are found in Minnesota, according to Nettleton, where the largest catch was 56 inches long and weighed 54 pounds.

Fishermen from northern Iowa have landed some large fish over the years, staggering with huge pike-perch, northern pike, catfish and muskies. This gallery with …

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Source:https://globegazette.com/outdoors/north-iowa-fishing-report-for-july/article_d106f990-e259-5f51-8f7c-63da507547df.html

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