Northland fly designer creates innovative streamers that flatten fish catch

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Brammer, 27, discovered fishing later than many fishermen, but quickly hooked.

"On my first trip to Ontario when I was 14, I was the only fisherman in the camp who didn't catch a pike," Brammer said. "It started to consume me. My father and his friend caught multiple 30 to 40 inch pikes in their fly rods. Somehow, it occurred to me that if I wanted to catch a pike, I had to learn to fly fish."

The following year, Brammer received a 9-peso rod with a floating line and a variety of tied raw flies. He prepared the outfit and practiced throwing in the yard before a trip back to Canada.

"That first fish broke my fly," said Brammer. "It was probably only 22 inches long, but it didn't matter. It was a pike, and I did eat my fly. That was all for me."

The following winter, his parents gave him another gift that would forever change his perspective on fly fishing and tying. It was a book entitled "Modern Streamers for Trophy Trout" by Kelly Galloup. Galloup was from Traverse City, Michigan, where Brammer also lived, but had recently moved to Montana. He was widely regarded as one of the main innovators in design and presentation of streamers.

"A year later, I spent the summer working for Kelly in her fly shop on the bank of the Madison River," Brammer added. "For four months I worked in the store, lived in a trailer 50 feet from the river and went fishing seven days a week, every morning, every afternoon and every day off."

Brammer quickly learned to read the water to discover where the fish were. During his time in Montana he was able to experience high water conditions during the spring, normal flows during the summer and little water during the fall.

From flying tying to flying design

"It still seems strange to me that I have become a & # 39; social media influencer & # 39;" Brammer said. "I only started tying flies 14 years ago and, to be honest, I wasn't very good during the first decade or so. However, once I plunged into the process, I made rapid progress."

Brammer's desire to understand how the materials and tying techniques affected the action of a finished fly was essential to perfect his trade.

"Take someone who has been tying flies for years and is quite dedicated," he said. "Let's say they tie for about an hour every weekend throughout the year. That's about 50 hours a year behind the press, and that time could be divided between dry flies, nymphs and streamers.

"I worked as a commercial level for three years and spent more than 50 hours a week tying nothing but streamer patterns. During my first year of full-time bonding, I spent more time in my bank than many avid levels went through throughout his life. ".

The constant linking of durable and effective flies requires hundreds of hours of experience. Three years as a full-time commercial flight level left Brammer with a lifetime experience compared to amateur levels. Photo courtesy of Gunnar Brammer.

The constant linking of durable and effective flies requires hundreds of hours of experience. Three years as a full-time commercial flight level left Brammer with a lifetime experience compared to amateur levels. Photo courtesy of Gunnar Brammer.

Brammer said that experience is critical to understanding the details that separate good levels from good ones.

"I have more than 100 bucktails in my materials container at the moment," he said. "It is a natural material and only two of them could be the same. Some have long, faint fibers that are good for building long tails. Others have shorter, curly fibers more suitable for building bulky heads. Perspective is needed to recognize the difference." . "

Brammer has designed dozens of original streamers and is proud to perfect each pattern before sharing them with its audience.

"When I'm working on a new employer, I don't fish with anything else," he said. "Each new streamer is designed to meet a need, a particular presentation. I start with a prototype and then take it to the river to see how it catches. Then I go back to the press to make modifications. By the time I publish a tutorial on YouTube, each fly It has been refined many times. "

Brammer said he does not have a characteristic flight pattern, but a characteristic style. It favors the streamers with a fusiform shape that has a bulky shoulder and an elegant tail that continuously narrows to the tip. Each part of a fly must be clean to produce the proper aesthetic and swimming action.

"A properly tied streamer should look like a bait fish, swim like a bait fish and match the particular presentation for which it was designed," he added.

Start tying flies

Fly-tying equipment and materials do not have to be expensive, but Brammer warns newcomers not to buy an economical kit full of cheap tools that won't last and materials that they could never use.

"You should never be frustrated with your tools," he said. "I think the HMH Spartan is one of the most functional presses on the market. It is affordable, designed to last a lifetime and has interchangeable jaws that are suitable for everything from small mosquitoes to large saltwater streamers."

A pair of quality scissors and a bobbin of thread are the only other essential tools. Brammer said that the kit along with a ponytail, a pack of Flashabou, a pair of spools of 210 denier yarn and a packet of 2/0 bulk hooks will allow a new level to tie enough flies to fish from the opener to the ice.

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"I have been blessed with excellent mentors who have helped my development," said Brammer. "I keep in regular contact with Kelly Galloup and Bob Popovics, and they both have a huge impact on my relationship. I also follow other YouTubers like Andreas Andersson, Niklaus Bauer, Norbert Renaud, Ulf Hagstrom, Daniel Holm, Jari Koski and Rupert Harvey." .

Brammer has also created an Amazon page with books and videos that have helped in its evolution of fishing and bonding.

"It gives me so much value to reread and see these resources again," he said. "A single book can contain 30 revelations that will improve your trade. However, during the first reading, you could only retain five of them. In the second, you could internalize another five. But over time all that information becomes intuitive."

Start fly fishing

Brammer warns rookie fly fishermen to avoid what he calls the "industry trap."

"Most companies want to sell you boots and boots, expensive rods and reels and specialized accessories," Brammer said. "But the truth is that you do not need it. Most of my local fishing was spent wading rivers like St. Louis in shorts and old tennis shoes. I carry my equipment in the same backpack that used to carry books when I was at University . "

Brammer added that cheap rods such as the St. Croix Mojo Bass series can be purchased for $ 150 and are ideal for throwing streamers to largemouth, pike and muskie. A $ 50 reel, a Dacron backup and a flight line complete a functional and affordable outfit.

"I use a slow sinking flight line (Type 3) for 90% of my fishing," he added. "That allows me to swim weightless streamers from several centimeters to several feet below the surface. Fishermen who fish floating lines generally need to use heavy flies to get the proper depth."

Brammer ties a simple three-foot leader of the same monofilament line length of 20 and 12 pounds. It joins the two sections with a double uni knot and then joins the fly with a non-slip mono loop knot. Many online resources teach novice fishermen to tie these basic but essential knots.

"When I'm fishing on the beach, I usually throw perpendicularly to the shore and recover the fly while swaying slightly downstream in the stream," Brammer said. "That keeps the fly on the side of the fish. I am convinced that the profile triggers more predatory fish attacks than a head or tail sight."

The chosen one

    Brammer's Chosen is a versatile fly pattern tied with a minimum number of materials. It has been shown to be effective for a variety of freshwater and saltwater fish species. Photo courtesy of Gunnar Brammer.

Brammer's Chosen is a versatile fly pattern tied with a minimum number of materials. It has been shown to be effective for a variety of freshwater and saltwater fish species. Photo courtesy of Gunnar Brammer.

Gunnar Brammer created this fly pattern to be infinitely flexible. The same recipe can be used to tie flies three to six inches long. The head can be left smooth or coated with a thin layer of silicone gel to change the action and buoyancy of the fly. It can also be tied on a template hook to provide an attractive vertical action during recovery.

  • Hook: Ahrex TP610 # 1 to 2/0

  • Tail: Squimpish hair mixed with Wing N & # 39; Flash

  • To: Squimpish hair mixed with Wing N & # 39; Flash

  • On wing: Peacock Herl

  • Head: Composite loop built with Squimpish hair (long), Strung Fuzzy Fiber (medium) and Strung Fuzzy Fiber (short)

  • Eyes: Adhesive mylar eyes 3/16 to ¼ inch

Source:https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/sports/outdoors/4746845-Northland-fly-designer-creates-innovative-streamers-that-flat-out-catch-fish

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