Seven for 7: Reeling & # 039; em in

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Seven for 7

In case you have not noticed, the summer cut is too fast. Julio is here and the heart of summer is upon us. Have you walked barefoot on the grass? Marshmallows roasted for a s & # 39; more? Looked at shooting stars? Those are suggestions you can make anywhere, but once again we have gathered unique ideas from the Great Lakes of Iowa. For the delivery of Seven for 7 in 2019, we present you with tasty snacks, spa treatments, men's fashion items, places to walk, things to ride, fishing guides and activities for rainy days for children. Let the good times pass!


Fishing with people who know these waters.

Several fishing guides practice their trade in the waters of the Great Lakes of Iowa. They help their clients to achieve the great ones and create memories that last a lifetime. And they know these waters better than anyone. We meet with seven guides to learn what they enjoy so much fishing and what makes these lakes so special.

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1. Rod Blau

JigMup | 712-346-8454 | www.jigmup.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: My dad had done it for a long time and when I left the army I was not doing it anymore, so if the boys wanted to go, we were just going fishing. Then, in 2009, I officially started the JigMup guide service in Okoboji.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: For me, I grew up in Sibley; I used to go to this old complex on the day I used to be behind Mau Marine. Grandpa and dad stayed there all the time and we would catch sheep, bulls, things like that. And we would fish the sand pits in Sibley and some in Ashton. We rode our bicycles to Ashton dragging a small luggage rack with our equipment and we spent the whole day there and came back at night.

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: I've had a couple in which a client is attacking a bluegill or whatever, and a muskie eats it by the side of the boat and they can fight for a while. I only have one in the boat. Many of them fight for a long time and then the muskie decides to let it go when you have the net below them. The whole muskie thing in this lake is nice and gives it another dimension. Take someone out and catch the biggest fish you've ever caught, it's a lot of fun. It is about that emotion. Many people can not really do this like I do every day. Many people are not used to fishing anything and whatever the rope goes down is a big problem for them. I'm here to have a good time and the more fish we catch, the better it will be. I want people to experience what the Okoboji is about. We have excellent fishing, excellent restaurants, everything is great, you can not beat it.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: I'm a muskie boy. I also love chasing the bass, do not get me wrong. I fish three muskie tournaments every summer in Wisconsin. If they're going out here, I catch them here, too. It is the challenge. They are just a difficult fish to catch. They are the apical predator so they eat when they want and eat what they want at any time of the day or night, and if you are not out in that feeding window – bad luck. Under we just went out and got them. They pull strong and people love it.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: Everything for me is that I started because my dad loved doing this: getting people to fish. And I feel the same way. There is nothing more fun than having someone to hit a big shot and take a picture with them after giving a halt to their friends. There may be difficult days, but in West Lake Okoboji it's hard to have a difficult day, it's really that good. The structure and the species that it possesses is insane. Not many places have an ecosystem like the one we have here. The spirit grows fast fish. Fast fish culture center. The west is not completely made in the same way, but it still builds fish and builds them quickly, even with all the pressure it receives, especially in winter.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: Anti-slip temples are an excellent way to catch fish for newbies. I use them all the time in deeper water when I know how deep I need the bait to be. The most important thing for me is to start somewhere. Right next to a pilkey is a great way to catch fish. If you have a depth finder, start looking for weeds. If you come to Okoboji find the brush and you will find bluegills.


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2. John Grosvenor

JTG Expeditions / Fish Okoboji | 712-330-5815 | www.fishokoboji.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: This is my 19th season as a full-time guide.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: My passion for fishing came from the English River in Canada in northwestern Ontario. My father was a school teacher, which left his summers open, so we moved there and lived in a resort camp. He worked as a hand dam and guide. These were the summers of the first to fourth grade years and I fished every day. If all the guides were taken, the boys would put me in their boat, I knew where all the dangers were, so I was a kind of first degree guide!

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: It's about the people. I remember my first year doing this. I had a family that was staying in Fillenwarth and my days were confused. I arrived late to pick them up. I got scared and ran there fast. Someone said that they heard them talking about going under a bridge, so I searched each bridge until I found them and said: "Come in, let's go fishing". And they had the best time of their lives and captured more fish than they could. Imagine. I told them I would not accept any payment because I was late, but they insisted anyway. Those children were between 9 and 10 years old and now they have their own children who bring fishing with me. I have had many families with me since the beginning and that is one of the best things. There was another day that I received a call from a client and he told me that he wanted to take his children to fish to catch a muskie. I told him that probably is not the best idea for young children, but it turned out that I had a good bite that year, so I said we could try. And we have three muskies that day. I could not believe it. I would have liked to have one and it is very, very rare to get three. I found a time after that client had been battling cancer and had died. So that was a day that God gave us. It was simply amazing. I will never forget that.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: Whatever it bites, man! Okoboji is known for his great bluegills. People come from all over the country, especially in the winter, to catch big bluegills here. I love catching the walleye when they are biting, but I hate when they are not. The month of May is when I receive my pikeperch. People just want to feel that bite, want to fight with a fish and want to be able to eat a couple. Therefore, I love what you are biting. Different seasons of the year that means different fish. Another thing about these lakes is that you never know what could be at the end of the line. There are so many species. The most I had on a guide trip was with a guy from Holland whose goal was to see how many species we could get in a single trip. We got 11 species that day, which was very good.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: You have a lot of different lakes, so if one lake does not go, you can go to the next and you'll find a bite somewhere. There are so many different ecosystems. My favorite is the west. It is a deep and clear lake fed by a spring that has to do with underwater structures. There is always a place where you can go fishing. The structure is something that people can find intimidating and things that work in other lakes do not always work here, but there's no reason to have a super difficult day. If you change gear soon enough, you'll be catching fish. I love the clarity of the water. It's really fun to see the fish you're fighting at 20 feet deep. And I'm intrigued by the people here. I love listening to their stories, for me it is fascinating and it is these people who really make these lakes special. I love the company and meet new people, listen to their stories and share mine, and teach people how to fish.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: On this lake, I've found that if you hang a live bait under a cork long enough to catch something. If you stop at bait shops, they can tell you which parts of the lake have been better and help eliminate some of the guesswork. And there's the old expression "you can not catch anything sitting on the couch", so go out and give it a try.


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3. Shane Akin

Guide service of the great lakes | 712-330-0085 | www.bojiguide.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: I led part-time for almost 30 years and have been full time for the past five years.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: My dad was a well-known fisherman in the Midwest, so I grew up with him. I've been in a boat a lot since I could be in one. My first real memory of fishing was when I was six years old. My family had a place in Leech Lake, MN, and I caught my first Muskie. That always stands out.

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: As far as the client is concerned, I really enjoy when we have children on the boat. Looking at the smiles and watching them learn, especially at the time when most children use XBox or electronic devices, to take them to the boat where it is no longer, you can see what nature is about. A recent memory would be for a six-year-old boy to make a 26-inch pike perch. And about five minutes later he got a 24-inch pike perch. We went fishing last summer and I always put bobbers because there are always bass and pike and roaming things. You never know what you are going to grab. I enjoy giving people the best experience in the lake that I can.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: My favorite fish is muskie. It's like hunting a big dollar out of a deer stall. You try to discover the pattern and where they could be. You can fish five days in a row and not see a fish and, suddenly, that sixth day you catch one and the whole wait disappears. They are the king of fresh water and getting one is a hurry. I take pride in being a multispecific guide. I'm going to catch anything.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: West Lake Okoboji is especially a world-class fishery. It has everything from tremendous bluegill and crappie fishing to long mouth, small mouth, walleye, muskies and perch. What makes it exciting is that you will always find something that bites somewhere and you never know what will appear. Last year, I made a muskie trip and in the second I throw a 39-inch catfish nailed to the bait just below the surface, things like that happen all the time in West.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: The best thing is to investigate. Go to the bait shops and start asking where they are trapping the manure or the perch or whatever. Many people will guide you on the right path. Fishing is just fun. Everyone loves to fish. I do not care if you've never been fishing before, if that rod is bent, it's a pleasure to see it.


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4. John Campbell

Campbell Fishing expeditions | 239-860-0976 | www.campbellfishing.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: I have been guiding here for 10 years. Guided from December to April in Marco Island, FL. The funny thing is that my heart is more in the north, so I joke with the people who left the 150-pound pompons to go back north to catch 1-pound bluegill.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: My relatives are from here, but I grew up in Chicago. My parents took me out when I was 2 years old to fish in the wharves of West Okoboji in search of panfish. That's what got me into the subject of fishing at a young age. Later I got a competitive streak and I fished the In-Fisherman Pro Walleye Trail and FLW Outdoors for approximately 24 years.

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: I had a young boy, an 8 year old boy, I got what I called an "Okoboji Slam". He caught a muskie, north, big mouth, small mouth and a walleye in a single day. I was dancing everywhere in the boat, so it was pretty clean.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: I'm probably more known for the walleye only because it's something I've pursued vigorously all my life. If I'm not chasing the walleye, I'll probably lean towards the jagged creatures like the muskie and the north.

Q: Congratulations for being included in the Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame. What has that meant for you? A: It was very exciting to be honest with the guys that I grew up reading about. My roommate from the university, Ted Takasaki, also made the hall and was there to introduce me, so having a lifelong friend there to present was also great.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: The Great Lakes of Iowa are some of the best fishing lakes in the world. You never know what you are going to catch, which is part of the great emotion that fishing has. The number of species and lakes reaches its peak at certain times, so it can usually remain with a fairly hot bite.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman in Okoboji? A: I would go to the bait shops. They have trained staff that will guide you in the right direction. Moving is a good thing. If something does not work in 20 minutes, it's probably good to go somewhere else.


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4. Darrin Jones

Large fin guide service | 712-420-9972 | [email protected]

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: I have been guiding the Great Lakes of Iowa since 2011.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: My love for this area began when I was in high school. My father was a director and every summer we stayed at Village West. When I was 5-7 years old, we lived in Nebraska for a while and approached the Lakes or Storm Lake and did a lot of fishing on the shore, and that fueled my passion for it. So I've always liked to fish from a young age and, somehow, for a full-time job, I ended up working here for the DNR for the wildlife section.

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: A couple of summers ago, we were not talking to them, we were actually catching a couple of mussels, 38 and 40 inches, since we were jumping on our rocks. I enjoy transmitting the knowledge to another person so that they have the confidence to do it on their own. It is an excellent way to educate children about the outdoors, teaching them about fishing. I like to give them something they can take to the dock and be successful too. And it's not just catching fish, it's creating memories for families. You can start a tradition and return every year for the 4th of July or the Memorial Day and this is what you do.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: It's a difficult decision because I like everything. I love panfish, probably it's up there because of all the different ones we have in the lakes. Probably panfish, walleye, bass would be the order. And I also enjoy when people just want to troll and cover a lot of water, and you never know what could jump there.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: Multispecies possibilities. We have had many times that we have captured 7-8 species in a four-hour trip. The diversity of the lakes here too. You can reach all these different lakes in the same chain and show customers parts of the lakes that you have not seen before.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: The most important thing would be if you are just trying to catch some fish: get an ultra light rod and a sliding bobber, and a black hair template in this area will capture all kinds of fish. Tilt it with a Belgian worm under a float around springs or structures and you will catch fish.


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6. Chad Loreth

Iowa Great Lakes outdoor | 712-330-9678 | www.igloutdoors.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: I started in 2013, so this would be our eighth open water season.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: I grew up going to the Alexandria area in Minnesota to fish when I was a child with my family and I grew up with fishing slips and walleye. My brother and I used to go fishing on the lake. We were able to explore a lot when we were children and we made many good memories fishing in that area. My wife Lisa, she's half the business with me, she's the boss! – and I found myself in Des Moines and then I ended up in Little Falls, MN, where I did a lot of fishing.

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: One of the funniest was with three brothers who usually book with me in the fall. We were fishing in East Lake with a good bit of walleye and a brother was not doing so well. I told him to stick to that, things can change in a split second. Not long after that, his rod doubles and he looks at his brothers and says "I'm sorry, guys, I'm taking them." Of course, it's a 28-inch, 8-pound pike, pretty clean. There are many small stories like that. We have great clients who come as strangers and leave as friends. I had a client who was one of the stealth bomber engineers. Last year I had a lawyer who worked for Clint Eastwood. You have the opportunity to meet all kinds of people.

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: My goal is to make people fish and bend the rods and have a good time. I like walleye and I like small mouth. Walleye fishing here is pretty good without a doubt and there is something about walleye in the summer. I like to drag crankbaits for them in the background, it's a good time.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: First of all, it is the best place in Iowa for panfish. The clarity of the water can make it a challenge. What I have seen is that if you can fish in Okoboji, especially in West Okoboji, then you can fish anywhere. I like the challenge of these lakes. Every year I learn something new, which is fun.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: For the first time, make it simple. If you are interested in targeting what I would call a very big fish or trolling off the coast, then you will want to follow a guide normally. But there are many opportunities to fish in Okoboji and wherever you go fishing most of the summer.


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7. Doug Burns

The Iowa guide | 712-209-4286 | www.fishnfunokoboji.com

Q: How long has a fishing guide been? A: I started in 1986 but I went out several times. I try to find real jobs, but they do not seem appropriate! So, 33 years for the most part. I've been here since 1999.

Q: What are your first memories of fishing? A: We lived in North Dakota when I was 4-8 years old. My best friend's dad took us every other weekend. We troll in search of pikes in the summer and fish in ice for the perch in the winter. That's what made me start. When I moved here, my aunt took me fishing. He then tied the rods to the bicycle and drove to the local park to catch bull, bass and bluegill heads. As I grew up, it was the challenge that kept him interesting. I always say that two things keep a man in the water: catching fish and not catching fish. When I'm not catching them, I have to find out. I will not leave until I find something to bite. And, of course, when you're catching fish, then you can not leave!

Q: What are some of your favorite fish stories from guide tours? A: When I was 26 years old, I was hired as a dock attendant at a resort in Lake of the Woods. I cut the grass, I loaded the luggage, I cleaned many fish and, when I had free time, I went fishing. There was a day when the complex was full and all the guides were busy and these two old men wanted to go out. The resort said: "Well, Doug here is going to fish all the time, he can take you around and if you do not catch anything, you will not have to pay for a guide." I led 26 days in a row after that! The greatest joy is to see people realize that this is something constant. When people are new to fishing or say they never catch fish and then see the joy when they catch 20, 30, 40 fish in a day. They can not believe it. I remember a young man who got hooked on a big fish that turned out to be a 6 to 7 pound drum. When he finally saw the fish and put it in, he circled the boat screaming. His friends recorded it on video and it's one of those special moments you always remember. I've had four generations in the boat together and maybe 30 to 60 people a year who have never caught a fish in their life, it's great. Maybe 15 years ago I had a big family with three kids who were fishing bluegill and they were laughing, having a great time. They said, "Doug, we've been on three deep-sea fishing trips from Hawaii and we never had so much fun catching fish!"

Q: What is your personal favorite fish to catch? A: At the beginning of the season, I chase the ice binge. They are my pet fish. I get twice a year to fish mainly just for myself, in April and again in late October / November. I'm chasing small mouth then. They are the hardest biters, they jump, they move a lot, they can be whimsical, they can be a challenge, and I just like the way they fight.

Q: What do these lakes have that make them special? A: The joy of these lakes is the diversity we have here. I can fish walleye in the morning and then go for a long mouth in the afternoon. There is great panfish. We have bass fishing of world class and bass of small mouth. We have an excellent bluegill fishery and the crappies have been strengthened in recent years. You can have your choice.

Q: What advice and suggestions would you give to a beginner fisherman coming to Okoboji? A: These are very good fisheries for the recreational fisherman at the beginning and end of the season. There are many opportunities on the coast. Then, in the middle of summer, these are difficult lakes to catch fish regularly from the coast. Then they want to look for current areas like bridges, that will help. The local bait shops are very good at keeping people informed about what the sting is, so talk to them. Everyone is willing to help people who are fishing on their own.


Source:https://www.nwestiowa.com/okoboji_magazine/seven-for-reeling-em-in/article_edd22cd4-968a-11e9-b4e8-2ffb978d4b17.html

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